50 Cent's Wins Eviction Case Against Ex-Girlfriend

Hip-Hop mogul 50 Cent emerged victorious yesterday (April 3) in the eviction trial of his ex-girlfriend and their son from his Long Island house. "Today's a good day, I'm a winner," the G-Unit General rejoiced after hearing the verdict. "I always win. The house is mine. She just wants to drag the situation out as long as possible. I think she just wants to see me dragging me back and fourth to court. My time is worth a lot so I'm wasting my time right now."

The rapper (born Curtis Jackson) asked a judge to remove his child's mother Shaniqua Tompkins and the ex-couple's 10-year-old son, Marquise Jaskson, from a Long Island estate he owns.

According to FOX News, Fif paid about $2.4 million for the house, one of the largest in the Long Island town of Dix Hills. Tompkins filed a law suite accusing the rapper of breach of contract and unjust enrichment. Tompkins attorney Paul Catsandonis stated that 50 broke a promise to give Tompkins and their son a home.

"I've been with 50 for a very long time," Tompkins said to the press outside the courtroom, before the verdict was read. "He's a very evil and abusive man and that's why I left him in the first place. Any man that can evict his own child out of a house is evil. After I took care of him and I worked when he wasn't doing anything. He's a very evil and disgruntled man. I just hope God bless him."

Tompkins and Marquis, along with her daughter-from another relationship- were allowed to remain in the rapper's house under the condition that Tompkins use the monthly child support payments of $6,700 to find new residency.

Tompkins contends that the house was bought for her and Marquise. She claimed that Fif changed his mind about putting her name on the lease right before closing. Both parties agreed that the home was bought so Marquise would have access to a quality education.

After a two-and-a-half hour court session yesterday, Tompkins' motion was denied and was ordered to pay $9,000 in fees to 50. She has until the end of the school year to move out of the estate.

"[This is] absolutely not [over]," 50 explained to the press. "She's going to try to do everything she could do. She doesn't have a job. This is her job, chasing me around [and] seeing if she can get a few dollars."

Despite the fact the ruling went in Curtis' favor, Catsandonis plans to appeal.

"Nothing is final yet," he told reporters. "This is just one slight interference in the process. We're going all the way and we have a lot of contradictory testimony from Mr. Jackson. It will be raised again. I assure you...in Manhattan Supreme Court or any other courthouse we have to [go]. I'm a trial attorney, I don't give up!"

A displeased Tompkins left the courthouse with this to say, ""God bless Mr. Jackson," she said. "I hope he gets some help and that's just that. It's not final. We're still working on it."