Freddie Gibbs Responds To "Thuggin'" Criticism

In the latest episode of Noisey’s “The People vs.” segment, Freddie Gibbs responds to a series of YouTube comments about his Pinata track “Thuggin’” and the accompanying video.
Responding to a commenter questioning the morality of the message contained in the song and video, Gibbs alluded that it’s a parent’s responsibility to filter whatever media their children might consume.
 
“Well, you know what man, MechanicalAnimal? I’m soon to be a parent,” Gibbs said. “I kind of understand you but I don’t. You supposed to control the media and things that you’re kids see in your household so that’s not my job. I do this to feed my family. My mom living good off these thug-ass raps, me rapping about crack and shit like that. You want me to stop my money so a kid—that’s the parent’s job. You lucky that you’re kid just seen that shit on YouTube ‘cause I was seeing that shit up close in person. I think I kind of turned out to be alright so I think your child will be fine.”
 
In a similar answer, Gibbs reiterated that “smoking crack is not cool but it’s definitely a reality.”
 
“With this video, what we were trying to bring across was the reality of the situation,” he added. “He was really smoking crack in that video but we weren’t trying to just sell it on that angle. We just wanted to give you a vivid interpretation of what really goes on. Had to had a guy smoke crack. He liked it. It was good crack. We put our good mix on it.”
 
Replying to a user under the name Kevin King, Gibbs addressed the dirty dishes visible in parts of the video.
 
“In that kitchen, we were kind of cooking crack there,” he said. “So we gotta cook our crack, get our get-back, then we’ll do our dishes. We’ll have a dope fiend do the dishes later on. So, the dishes’ll get done, we just didn’t get to that part in the video. Sorry about that Kevin.”
 
Explaining his pride in being able to release Pinata independently, the ESGN emcee also spoke more generally about his filling several roles in the making of the project.
 
“I think at the end of the year, on the end-of-the-year lists, you definitely gotta put me up there with some of the best albums of the year,” he said. “To accomplish that and do that with no backing, no no label, no nothing. To do [it] totally one hundred percent on my own is a beautiful thing ‘cause I’m the investor, I’m the executive producer, I’m a CEO, and I’m the talent. So I big homie everything.”